My Role at Vignette: Managing Editor

The Kent State studio in New York is the ultimate hub for immersion into the world of fashion media. I have the unparalleled education and internship opportunities here to thank for taking my knowledge to the next level. In our Fashion in the Media course, we delve into all aspects of fashion media from Public Relations to Publishing.

As tradition from the students before us, our final assignment of this course is create a magazine, Vignette. Our professor assigned us each a role based off of our prior assignments. I was lucky enough to be chosen to work as the Managing Editor, and I couldn’t be more excited! With our specific roles in mind, our class came together to collaborate on making our own unique version of Vignette to showcase all we’ve learned this semester.

As Managing Editor, I worked with the team of editors to brainstorm content based off of the media kit other members of our class presented. We kept our reader in mind to create content with our target reader’s likes and aspirations in mind. The mix of prior experience and strong organizational skills made me equipped to ensure deadlines were met and content was up to par. I also acted as Copy Editor to make sure the grammar styles stayed consistent throughout and helped in developing the content for the writers’ voices to be heard to the best of their abilities.

There’s not much I love working on more than magazine publishing, so this was the perfect opportunity to enhance my skillset to be ready to take on an editorial internship this summer. Scroll through the digital version below to see what we’ve come up with. Enjoy!

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American vs Global Fashion Media

With eyes recently directed overseas during the chaos of fashion month, our Fashion in the Media class was inspired to explore the differences in American and global fashion media. I choose to focus solely on print publications for this assignment.

scarlett-johansson-marie-claire-us-march-2017-issue-2I will say, it is hard to sum up global fashion media, and even American media, by just observing a select few publications. Each magazine, writer and publisher has their own voice and takes on news worthy events in their own way. To narrow the spectrum, I focused on Fashion, produced in Canada, and Marie Claire, produced in New York, for their similarity in tones and audience.

Initially, the covers hosted parallel features in their neutral backgrounds, large typography and a well-known celebrity on the cover. In other countries, it is still common to have models on the covers, but it is becoming the norm to feature profit driving celebrities. Although, Fashion does have a cleaner appearance with less typography, keeping the focus on the star.

Their content is also very similar. Each publication informs readers about a variety of topics starting with fashion then continuing on to beauty, feature stories and the arts. One topic that stood out to me in Fashion was their section covering Fashion Careers. fashion-magazine-march-2017-cover-sophie-trudeau-01-480x0-c-defaultI really loved how the magazines voice was not talking down to the reader in a prestigious way but wanted to encourage you like a friend. They talked about trends in a very wearable tone by using images from the runways but were not directly reviewing each show.

Where I noticed the most difference was within the imagery and advertising. There was remarkably less advertising throughout Fashion. The ads were not repeated and kept more strictly in the front of the magazine. It was also much more cluttered with the imagery. They tried to filled the entire page with repetitive images versus leaving white space. I understand the importance of taking full advantage of each page, but it’s also important to leave the page clean and visually appealing to the eye.